Ramadan Series - Anger issues while fasting.

9:55:00 AM Ayesha Farhad 43 Comments


Ramadan is nearly upon us and I am absolutely looking forward to it. It is a month of abstinence from all the evil that we do in our daily lives intentionally and unintentionally. It is a month, where you fast from dawn to dusk, to realise the plight that people in poverty go through all around the world. There are many people, who starve through the days because they can not find anything to eat. Fasting makes you put yourself in their shoes even if its for a few hours. You not only abstain from food but from the worldly issues too. Gossiping, backbiting, bringing each other down, cursing and everything that might hurt you or the next person.

But with fasts really long this summer, we always tend to get cranky and more agitated with the people and situations around us. Especially being a mother, you get more frustrated with hyper active toddlers and eventually scream and scold them to calm down. In return, they think negative about fasting and the benefits that it brings in. The lack of food and hydration also brings in a headache for the first week, which in turn gets you more tired than usual.

So how do you control your anger and frustration this Ramadan? These are very few simple tips that will help you control it and help you enjoy the essence of Ramadan more. 

Pray. Pray as much as you can. That is the beauty of it. Praying makes you forget the anger that has been piling up. You do not always have to sit down on the prayer mat to pray. Just sit on your sofa, and pray silently. Make duaa for yourself and for your family. It instantly releases you of all the stress that has been with you all day. 

Prepare everything beforehand. Usually, mothers, what they do is, they start preparing for iftaar on the same day. During the fast. A few hours before you have to open the fast. That adds to your stress even more and you become more agitated. Prepare your food a day before. After opening your previous fast. Relax and think about what you are going to make for the next day and then keep everything in preparation so that you don't have to rush around the next day trying to finish cooking the food before the maghreb Azaan. I have been trying this since last year and I can not tell you how much easier it is for me during the next day.

Take deep breaths. Sometimes, when something angers us, we forget to breath and instantly react on the situation in a negative way. When you know that something is stressing you out, take deep breaths immediately. This sends signals to the brain to relax and to think more carefully and calmly.

Smile.  When your child spills juice all over the carpet, smile. Ask them to help you clean up. When you think you are stressing to much and the frustration is building up, smile and think of the good times. Smiling relaxes your body so much that you won't even remember why you were frustrated in the first place.

The true essence of Ramadan is to overcome the demons that shadow us in our daily life. Not only for this one month, but also for the rest of your life too. It gives you practice for the rest of the year. It helps you build your self to a stronger person and not let anger and frustration take the better off you.

How do you overcome the anger during Ramadan? Do you have any tips? Let me know :)

43 comments:

  1. I don't celebrate Ramadan, but this was a very interesting read!

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  2. My son had friends who celebrated Ramadan. They had a tough time at school.

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  3. I dont celebrate Ramadan but it is interesting to find out about it and some of the things you go through, i imagine its not easy!

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  4. I find that short power naps help as well along with the tips above.

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  5. Good luck Ramadan, it is interesting to know how you manage to cope with the issues that come with fasting. Thank you for sharing.

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  6. I don't practice Ramadan, but I've found that yoga breathing always makes me feel better. Whenever I start to feel my blood pressure rising, I focus on my breath. It's worked wonders x

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  7. Thanks for sharing this article this is very great about Ramadan

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  8. This is very interesting. I have never fasted before but this is great to know! Thanks for sharing

    XO-Lisa
    www.thatssodarling.com

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  9. I have friends who find it difficult being around none fasting friends during Ramadan when they're eating xxx

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  10. I've always wondered how Muslims handle Ramadan when they start to feel really hungry. I am Christian and I observe Lent during the Easter season. It is similar to Ramadan as we abstain from certain things and reflect on our faith. I admire you for practicing Ramadan and growing stronger in your faith.

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  11. A very useful post indeed. All the tips given are so practical especially the deep breathing exercise. I truly feel that if we are more organised that itself makes fasting easy.

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  12. I have heard of Ramadan which is normally on Muslim countries and I am glad that now I know what is the meaning of it. I have great respect on this and I hope that many people like you practice it.

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  13. I admire people who are able to fast through the whole period during the summer, you must have such dedication and faith x

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  14. Honestly I am not looking forward to 18 hour fasts themselves...and not afraid to admit it.. It is hard...but alhamdulillah

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  15. So many wonderful ideas here! Thank you for sharing.

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  16. Those are good ways to manage our mental health, thank you for share

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  17. I don't celebrate Ramadan, but enjoyed reading the post. You made so many wonderful ideas, I'm sure they will come in handy sometime in life.

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  18. Good luck with Ramadan I know how hard it is fast but it is nice to acknowledge the plight of those in poverty. What a good deed x

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  19. I don't celebrate Ramadan, but good luck, as it sounds super challenging :) x

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  20. That was a really interesting read, thanks for this. Ramadan sounds like a real challenge, but fantastically rewarding too :)

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  21. Fasting can be so tough, some really great tips here. Thanks for sharing :)

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  22. This is such an interesting read - I'm the angriest person ever when I'm hungry, so I can imagine fasting and keeping your cool can be really tough!

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  23. It's so interesting to learn about your culture. I've never heard of Ramadan and I'm sure fasting would be too difficult for me to go through so I wish you well during this time.

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  24. We don't practice Ramadan but it was interesting reading your tips. Not sure I could survive an all day fasting

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  25. we could all do with fasting from the negative parts of life like gossiping. Such good tips and would work for more than ramadan!

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  26. These are great tips for Ramadan celebrators. It can also be helpful to anyone that fasts!

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  27. These are amazing tips masha'Allah. I will try and use them in sha'Allah x

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  28. For me, smiling when my child creates a mess would be really painstaking. Although I'm not an OCD, I still make sure that everything in my house is spick and span. Just can't see any mess, it frustrates me even more.

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  29. I'm always opened to learn about different spiritual practices. Often times...we try to separate ourselves but there is so much to learn from one another. I appreciate you sharing these tips...these are the type of tips you can use beyond a holiday..smiling, breathing techniques...all good on a daily basis! love it

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  30. Ramadan sounds very interesting. While I do not celebrate it, I do know what the power of prayer can do.

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  31. I have some friends who do struggle during Ramadan, these are some great tips for them :)

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  32. I don't practice Ramadan actually this is the first time i heard about it, but I've found that yoga breathing always makes me feel better

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  33. You have touched upon an important topic here. I fast on certain days, too and irritability and anger because of hunger are the issues I face. Loved reading how you deal with it :)

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  34. I've always been too tiny (weight) to fast ( go without eating) so I usually fast something I love like soda or tv.

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  35. I have friends that take part in Ramadan and they have spoke about the struggle with fasting. I understand it a lot more now given your explanations and hope that this time it will be a little less stressful for you x

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  36. I get hangry then my blood sugar drops. I don't know if I could survive a fast!

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  37. I can't fast, because I am sure it would have dangerous consequences... but this is good to know! Thanks for sharing!

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  38. Great tips on how to handle Ramadan and fasting. In Sha Allah this year will be a successful Ramadan.

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  39. It was such a good read and thank you for all the constructive tips that you have provided.

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  40. I do not celebrate Ramadan, but as a Christian fasting is a part of what we do on a regular basis. I think it helps us to empathize when someone say they are hungry

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  41. Very interesting read. This is also important us non-Muslim to know, to have wider understanding of our Muslim friends.

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  42. That's a much needed reminder. What I think is, with the right intentions and duaas, we may actually end up being more productive and social while fasting!

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  43. That's a useful article madhaAllah. What I believe is, with the right intentions and duaas, we may end up more productive and social while fasting

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